Tartiflette

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Tartiflette.  This recipe is inspired by our ski trips to France, where we always have a ‘cheese meal.’  This particular gooey cheese dish is common fare in Alpine ski towns and a great meal to have after a day on the slopes.  Or in my case, when our heat stopped working for a few days.

This dish is particularly common at mountain self-serve restaurants since it isn’t as time sensitive as other French cheese meals: fondue & raclette (both need table side equipment to serve).

Tartiflette can come out of the oven and sit a little bit before serving; making this ‘ski chalet’ classic the most accessible to the home cook.  And while the rustic style of the dish conjures up images of centuries past; it is actually a recent innovation.  In the 1980s Reblochon cheese producers developed wpid-wp-1423490045443.jpegTartiflette as a way to boost sales of their cheese (well played cheesemongers!).  Equally capitalistic is the sale of special ‘tartiflette’ pans in ski towns.  It’s just a casserole/lasagna dish (though they do write the recipe on it).  My skillet is oven safe, and I didn’t feel like doing extra washing; but if your’s isn’t, or you’re making a large batch, transfer the potato mixture to a greased pan before adding the cheese and putting it in the oven.

I don’t lose any sleep by varying the ‘classic’ recipe by using ham instead oOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAf smoked bacon (since that is what I had in the fridge).  But feel free to put the bacon back into the recipe (or leave out the meat if you are looking for a vegetarian option).  If you can’t find, or don’t like Reblochon; Brie or Camembert are good substitutes.  When I took the Reblochon out of the fridge there was a ‘funky’ cheese smell to it, but I didn’t find the taste to be that way.  It is like a tangy Brie, without that ‘blue cheesey-ness’ of Camembert.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWhen the cheese melts it forms a fondue like sauce with the liquid from the wine and cream.  Serve with a lightly dressed salad to cut the richness. (I think that is why pickled onions and gherkins are traditionally served with tartiflette, but salad does a better job in my opinion.)

Here is what you will need:

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Boil potatoes for 15-20 minutes.  Drain.  Let cool.

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Melt butter.  Chop and saute onions for about 8 minutes.

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Add ham.

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Half or quarter potatoes depending on their size.  Add to the pan and slightly brown.

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Add white wine and boil for 5 minutes.  Then add cream and toss to coat.

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Cut the cheese along the ‘equator’ and then into triangles.  Place on top of potato mixture.

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Place in the oven and broil for 5-10 minutes.

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Recipe serves 4

  • 2 lb (900 g) new potatoes
  • 2 tbsp of butter
  • onion
  • 4 oz (250 g) of ham
  • 1/2 cup (100 mL) white wine
  • 1/2 cup (100 mL) heavy cream
  • 1 lb (400 g) Reblochon cheese
  • gherkins & pickled onions to serve
  1. Wash and boil new potatoes with the skins on.  Set aside until cool to handle.
  2.  In an oven safe non-stick pan heat oil on medium-high.  Chop onion and saute until translucent.  Add ham to the pan and saute 3 more minutes
  3. Halve or quarter new potatoes depending on size.  Add to pan and lightly brown for about 5 minutes.
  4. Add white wine and boil for 5 minutes.  Then add cream, stir & heat until the potatoes are evenly coated.  [If you don’t have an oven safe non-stick pan, transfer the mixture to a greased casserole dish at this point.]
  5. Cut Reblochon cheese along the equator and then into triangles.  Place on top of the potatoes and broil for 5-10 minutes.

About Leslie@myfoodhistorytravelblog

Hey! I'm an American living in the UK with a passion for food, history, and travel. You can follow my experiences at myfoodhistorytravelblog.com (not a creative title - but you know what you'll be getting).
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One Response to Tartiflette

  1. sabine says:

    A great , rustic dish to have after a long day outside. I love your story behind the dish, that it isn´t really traditional. But no matter how (not so) long ago it was invented – it surely is delicious!

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